Spring break and Bird watching

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Black crested titmouse

Just about any location along the Gulf of Mexico’s Texas side is a great place to see migratory birds.

It’s a welcome sight for birds, since it’s the first solid landmass they’ve seen since leaving behind their wintering grounds in Latin America and the Caribbean. Often birds have been flying for 18 hours straight over the ocean to get here.
Sandhill cranes, geese and warblers can be seen here en mass.

Or, head to the Rio Grande Valley, a region four hours south of the preserve known for its combination of marshlands and woodlands. This valley is a great spot for songbirds and shorebirds to refuel. According to the World Birding Center, nearly 500 species have been spotted there over the years, including long-billed thrashers and black-crested titmouse.

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Sandhill Crane
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Long billed Thrasher
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Warbler

2 important things you would need for bird watching:

1- 7-power or 8-power binoculars—they’re a nice mix of magnification while still allowing you a wide enough view that your bird won’t be constantly hopping out of your image.

2- the Sibley Guide, in either its full North America version or smaller, more portable Eastern and Western editions. Other useful guides are Kaufman’s, Peterson’s, the National Geographic guide.

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